reede, märts 09, 2007

Island ja Eesti

Unknown to many but familiar to most Icelanders is the role they played in Estonia's wily escape from the Soviet Union in the late 1980s and early 1990s. A summary of the relationship can be found here, published by the Estonian Foreign Ministry last year.

I am currently interested in tracking down any Estonians that have spent considerable time in Iceland, and Icelanders that have spent time in Estonia for a project I am working on.

18 kommentaari:

Kaur ütles ...

I don't know if this is useful to you, but Milton Friedman cetainly is a person that is connected with both Estonia and Iceland. He is considered to be the father of Estonia's economy and there is almost a legend that his book "Free to Choose" was the only book on market economy that Mart Laar had ever read before becoming prime minister. Friedman's connection with Iceland is briefly described in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman#Iceland

Flasher T ütles ...

I'm going to Iceland on holiday soon, if that helps any. :)

Anonüümne ütles ...

btw milton friedman is dead

falskur fugl ütles ...

I lived in Iceland for 4 years, currently living in Estonia.

Trulla ütles ...

http://www.siimteller.com/2002/02/island_on_uks_tore_koht.html

Isiklikult mina olen lugenud Mait Trink'i pere muljeid sealsest elust.

Trulla ütles ...

http://www.maaleht.ee/?old_rubriik=7600&old_art=38355&old_num=

Siin ka veel natuke eestlastest Islandil.

Toomas ütles ...

I know that Olavi Kõrre have spent some time there
http://www.parnupostimees.ee/141005/esileht/kultuur/10059428_1.php

Trulla ütles ...

http://www.sloleht.ee/index.aspx?id=157020

Sellesama Mait Trink'i muljed Islandist.

Giustino ütles ...

E-mail me at admin @ giustinopetrone.com

Jens-Olaf ütles ...

Maybe usefull to quote The Baltic Independent No 74 August 1991:
'The most active part in bringing about Western recognition was played by the Northern countries, notably Iceland and Denmark. There even emerged some sort of a race to see who could be the first to recognize the Baltic States.
...
Earlier in the year, Iceland was the first nation to recognize Lithuania's declaration of sovereignty.'

space_maze ütles ...

Iceland and Estonia? The first connection I can think of is the painful discussion I've had oh so many times in German - in which Estonia is "Estland" and Iceland is "Island":

"So, where were you in your holiday?"
"Estland."
"Oh wow. Did you get to see any geysers?"
"What?"
"Well, if you were in Island..."
"No, not Island. Estland."
"....?"

Scott ütles ...

If I remember correctly, the park outside of the soon-to-be blowed up Sakala Center in Tallinn is named in honor of Iceland for their early recognition. Good for them.
Some countries, like Germany and Sweden, were much more cautious, even in some cases discouraging independence.
The U.S. was late, despite its long-standing policy regarding Baltic occupation. But that was more due to not wanting to rock Gorby's boat too much. After all, he had his plate full after the coup.

space_maze ütles ...

Sweden recognised Estonia after Russia did, actually, unless I'm mistaken. With friends like these ...

Giustino ütles ...

Sweden recognised Estonia after Russia did, actually, unless I'm mistaken. With friends like these ...

It just took them longer to realize what happened. They were too busy looking in the mirror :)

Andres ütles ...

The square in front of the foreign ministry building is called the Iceland Square. During Soviet times a big Lenin statue was there if I'm not mistaken.

Giustino ütles ...

The square in front of the foreign ministry building is called the Iceland Square. During Soviet times a big Lenin statue was there if I'm not mistaken.

I read somewhere that prior to the March 1944 bomb raids on Tallinn the area was covered in homes. The square was designed after the war.

Jens-Olaf ütles ...

There must be tight connections between estonian scientists and their icelandic collegues about the famous gen projects. Maybe Eesti Biokeskus in Tartu knows.

Manuel Alvarez-Rivera ütles ...

If I'm not mistaken, Iceland was also the first country in the world to recognize newly-independent Montenegro last year, after it voted to break off its union with Serbia.

P.S. I just added to my website a section about parliamentary elections in Iceland.