kolmapäev, mai 24, 2006

Õpime Sõbrad!

OK, so I have two main missions in life - Mission 1 - make music. Mission 2 - õppida eesti keelt. The missions are not exactly in that order.

In order to increase my Estonian skills I have decided to put together vocabulary lists. Today's words/phrases to be learned are the following -
Lasema Õhku
Plehku Panema
Suurepärane
Lööma/Lüüa
Kunagi


Knowing the basic meanings is the easy part. 'Lasema õhku' means to 'blast away.' I learned this from Jüri Liim in Postimees. The phrase can be used like so, I believe:

"Jüri Liim tana hommikul ütles et ta tahaks laseda pronkssõduri õhku."

'Plehku panema' I learned from E Nagu Eesti. I think you can use this one like so:

"Epp proovis püüdma Martat, aga Marta panes plehku."

'Suurepärane' is an adjective. I think it should be easy to incorporate. It seems like a synonym of 'täiuslik' and 'imehea.' So it can be used like this:

"Oi oi oi, vanaema. Sinu klimpisüpp on tõesti suurpärane!"

'Lööma/Lüüa' looks less promising. Let's try this one in the past tense.

Eesti löös Taani üleeile jälgpallis.

Bear with me. I know this is frustrating to watch...Ok, here's our final term, 'kunagi.' Oh, it would be nice to know how 'mitte kunagi' and 'nähagi' are different. But let's try 'kunagi.'

Mart söi pitsat ühest restoranist Tallinnas, aga ta oli häige sellel õhtul. Ta ütles mulle et ta ei viitsi süüa seal samal kohal mitte kunagi.

I await your many corrections...

14 kommentaari:

Tatsutahime ütles ...

Õpime!

Good! Only some grammar mistakes, but you grasped the meanings perfectly!

You tend to mix up da-form and ma-form of verbs.

da-form in Estonian is mostly required by modal verbs, except from should (peaks (tegema)) and partially must / have to (tuleb (teha), but peab (tegema))

These are _corrections_.

- Õhku _laskma_ (õhku lasta)

"Jüri Liim _täna_ hommikul ütles_,_ et ta tahaks _lasta_ pronkssõduri õhku."

- Plehku panema

"Epp proovis _püüda_ Martat, aga Marta _pani_ plehku."

- suurepärane
"Oi-oi-oi, vanaema. Sinu _klimbisupp_ on tõesti suurepärane!"

- Lööma/lüüa
"Eesti _lõi_ _Taanit_ üleeile _jalgpallis_."

- Kunagi
Dictionary says
kunagi = ever, someday, sometime
mitte kunagi = never
"nähagi" comes from "nägema" = to see.

"Mart _sõi_ pitsat _ühes_ _restoranis_ Tallinnas, aga ta oli _haige_ sellel õhtul. Ta ütles mulle_,_ et ta ei viitsi _seal kohas_ süüa _enam_ mitte kunagi.

Did you mean "ei viitsi" or "ei taha"?

There are always commas before:
- et
- sest
- sest et
- kuid
- vaid

You might want to check:
http://www.koolielu.edu.ee/ortograafia/

Anonüümne ütles ...

Did you really want corrections ;)

Trust me, if you didn't the next time don't say so. It works like red to bulls :-)

So Lets start from the begining, shall we?

Instead of "lasema õhku" the correct form in "laskma õhku" or even better would be to change the word order to "õhku laskma"
the sentence should be "Jüri Liim täna hommikul ütles, et ta tahaks lasta pronkssõduri õhku."
(To really nitpic, even better would be: "Jüri Liim ütles täna hommikul, et ta tahaks pronkssõduri õhku lasta."

"Epp proovis püüda Martat, aga Marta pani plehku." (past tense thus: pani, also: panes is no way correct, that is such a word does not exist in Estonian laguage)

The word is "klimbisupp" - and yes, my granny's dumpling spug is superbe.

"Eesti lõi Taani üleeile jälgpallis" (in Est the past tense isn't formed by addings s's to the end)

"Mart sõi pitsat ühes restoranis Tallinnas, aga ta oli haige sellel õhtul. Ta ütles mulle, et ta ei viitsi süüa seal samas kohas mitte kunagi."
A+ version would be: Mart sõi ühes Tallinna restoranis pitsat, aga ta oli sellel õhtul haige. Ta ütles mulle, et ta ei taha mitte kunagi enam seal süüa.
"Restoranist" would translate as from the restaurant, "restoranis" is in the restaurant.
"Seal samas" in this case is a bit redundant. Also "viitsima" is not the best verb to use in this case: instead of saying that you don't feel like dining there, if you're gonna use such a strong word as "never" you might aswell use a strongerword such as "want". And süüa... well, I'm sure Epp will fill you in about the few wonderful Est word that you spell and pronounce differently (Before -a in the end you also pronounce an i (the Est version of the letter taht is - so it's ['süia]

Giustino ütles ...

Thanks alot...I had no idea how to form the past tense of 'sööma' and 'lööma.'

I'll correct the title of the post so I don't look really dumb.

Eppppp ütles ...

past tense of 'sööma' and 'lööma.'

SÖÖMA (süüa)- to eat
Mina sõin
Sina sõid
Tema sõi
Meie sõime
Teie sõite
Nemad sõid

LÖÖMA (LÜÜA)- to hit
Mina lõin
Sina lõid
Tema lõi
Meie lõime
Teie lõite
Nemad lõid

And I would add one that is similar
JOOMA (JUUA)
Mina jõin
Sina jõid
Tema jõi
Meie jõime
Teie jõite
Nemad jõid

And all three want OSASTAV KÄÄNE after then.
Ma sõin leiba
Sa lõid venda
Ta jõi viina
etc...

Eppppp ütles ...

...and also, knowing your interest in dialects, my grandma sometimes says "nemad sõivad", although mainstream and grammatically correct is "nemad sõid".

Giustino ütles ...

Eppppp,

Kas sa oled püünud Martat täna või?

Eppppp ütles ...

Ei, aga ma olen püüdnud Martat täna. Ja ma püüdsin ta kinni!

Anonüümne ütles ...

Kas sa oled püünud Martat täna või?

püüdnud would be correct.

triin ja jeffers ütles ...

great job, justin! just keep going.
what i noticed and also noticed when my husband started learning estonian (and also sometimes now when he's tired), is that you both somehow tend to put "umlauts" everywhere possible. so, supp becomes süpp and jalgpall becomes jälgpall and so on. it is an interesting phenomenon.

oliver ütles ...

”Oh, you’re learning Estonian” ;)
http://www.hiiumaa.ee/douglas/keel.htm

It’s always nice to see someone trying to master (what some might even call difficult) Estonian language. You can already form sentences every Estonian easily understands because of the archaic structure of Estonian language (word order often irrelevant, no gender, no future tense and so on), but don’t stop here... There’s also cases (14 of them) and those extra cool conjugation-declination groups (no one exactly knows how many :)
Certain amount of “bookish knowledge” is always useful, but I think that Estonian is one of those languages that re2quires a lot of practice in real life to truly master it.


In addition to previous corrections and tips... “aga ta oli sellel õhtul haige” doesn’t feel quite right. “haige” is used for a longer period of time, for example: I was sick for 5 days – Ma olin 5 päeva haige.
You probably just wanted to say that he felt terrible and had a bad stomach-ache – tal oli õhtul kohutavalt halb (olla) ja tugev kõhuvalu (or kõht valutas, kõhus keeras an so on)


I accidentally found this great forum for Estonian language learners:
http://www.phrasebase.com/forum/board.php?FID=100
You should definitely check it out, lots of useful links and good advice.

It took some time but the Estonian Dictionary is finally online – you type in the word (original form) and it gives you expressions and examples (unfortyunately only in Estonian) AND a number of the “word type”. Click on it and new window opens with an example how to conjugate/decline such a word. The only thing missing is one good English tutorial.
http://www.keelevara.ee/login/

And if uou want to make your head hurt, I’ve got just the stuff:
http://www.eki.ee/teemad/morfoloogia/

Also, feel free to correct my English (not the typos – it’s 3:25 in the morning)

Giustino ütles ...

great job, justin! just keep going.
what i noticed and also noticed when my husband started learning estonian (and also sometimes now when he's tired), is that you both somehow tend to put "umlauts" everywhere possible. so, supp becomes süpp and jalgpall becomes jälgpall and so on. it is an interesting phenomenon.


Well, it happens because you try to spell phonetically, and if 'täna' has an umlaut, then you would expect that jalgpall (the 'a' sounds similar) would have one too.

The same thing with 'supp.'

Giustino ütles ...

great job, justin! just keep going.
what i noticed and also noticed when my husband started learning estonian (and also sometimes now when he's tired), is that you both somehow tend to put "umlauts" everywhere possible. so, supp becomes süpp and jalgpall becomes jälgpall and so on. it is an interesting phenomenon.


Well, it happens because you try to spell phonetically, and if 'täna' has an umlaut, then you would expect that jalgpall (the 'a' sounds similar) would have one too.

The same thing with 'supp.'

Giustino ütles ...

You probably just wanted to say that he felt terrible and had a bad stomach-ache – tal oli õhtul kohutavalt halb (olla) ja tugev kõhuvalu (or kõht valutas, kõhus keeras an so on)

Ma sõin eile üks salatit, ja minu kõht valutas.

Giustino ütles ...

It’s always nice to see someone trying to master (what some might even call difficult) Estonian language.

Estonian is difficult because of its lack of Indo-European root words and grammatical structure.

That being said, the words are not hard to pronounce, and, though Estonians speak quickly, they do not speak as quickly as Spanish speakers. It is easy to learn a word and then place it in a sentence and learn how to use it.

For example, I can read Spanish quite well. In New York most advertisements in the subways are in both English and Spanish. Often they are ONLY in Spanish.

But I cannot speak Spanish well because it is just TOO fast for me. It's so hard to keep up because they just shoot that language out of their mouth. And I studied Spanish for four years!

Italian is easier for me to follow, but there's so much slang and all Italians (except those from Northern and Central Italy) communicate in dialects.

Danish was difficult because they swallow all of their words. What you see on paper is NOT what comes out of people's mouths.

For example, in Denmark 'selvfolgelig' means something like 'kindlasti' does in Estonian. But it isn't pronounced that way. You don't say 'selv/folg/ge/lig'. It sounds more like 'sefoolee.'

And then there are the Slavic languages. God help us. Have you ever read Polish? How many 'z's and 'w's can you fit into one word?

I feel bad for my friend. He's learning Slovak. In Estonian, 'kitten' is 'kassipoeg.' In Slovak, 'kitten' is 'mačička' (pronounced 'macheetska.'